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Date: Wed,  2 Dec 2015 17:59:38 -0500 (EST)
From: cve-assign@...re.org
To: carnil@...ian.org
Cc: cve-assign@...re.org, oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
Subject: Re: Heap Overflow in PCRE

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> I have a question about CVE-2015-8384, according to
> https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1287623 the fixing commit
> in upstream VCS is r1558, but (cf.
> https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1287623#c6) CVE-2015-3210
> was assigned for the issue fixed by the same revision r1558.

We currently plan to keep CVE-2015-3210 and CVE-2015-8384 separate.

We'll try to answer the question in three ways:

1. Different attack methodologies discovered independently can have
separate CVE IDs, even if the fix is the same. We don't know of
any scalable way to reach a conclusion that
/^(?P=B)((?P=B)(?J:(?P<B>c)(?P<B>a(?P=B)))>WGXCREDITS)/ (which
is CVE-2015-3210) and /(?J)(?'d'(?'d'\g{d}))/ (which is
CVE-2015-8384) are the same attack methodology.

2. https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1226918#c9 indicates
that the CVE-2015-3210 attack is prevented by a commit for
"Fix buffer overflow for named recursive back reference."
Our experience is that Red Hat generally has a good process for
locating commits based on the associated bug reports; however,
we sometimes don't know how they reach a specific conclusion.

3. The pattern in question for CVE-2015-3210, i.e., the
/^(?P=B)((?P=B)(?J:(?P<B>c)(?P<B>a(?P=B)))>WGXCREDITS)/ pattern,
doesn't have any instances of something like \1 or \g that
are commonly used for a back reference. Although we haven't
studied the pattern in detail, we think the attack methodology
is different from the one that has a \g escape sequence.

- -- 
CVE assignment team, MITRE CVE Numbering Authority
M/S M300
202 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730 USA
[ PGP key available through http://cve.mitre.org/cve/request_id.html ]
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