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Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2020 15:54:23 +1100
From: Daniel Axtens <dja@...ens.net>
To: kernel-hardening@...ts.openwall.com,
	akpm@...ux-foundation.org,
	keescook@...omium.org
Cc: linux-kernel@...r.kernel.org,
	Daniel Axtens <dja@...ens.net>,
	Daniel Micay <danielmicay@...il.com>
Subject: [PATCH v2 1/2] string.h: detect intra-object overflow in fortified string functions

When the fortify feature was first introduced in commit 6974f0c4555e
("include/linux/string.h: add the option of fortified string.h functions"),
Daniel Micay observed:

  * It should be possible to optionally use __builtin_object_size(x, 1) for
    some functions (C strings) to detect intra-object overflows (like
    glibc's _FORTIFY_SOURCE=2), but for now this takes the conservative
    approach to avoid likely compatibility issues.

This is a case that often cannot be caught by KASAN. Consider:

struct foo {
    char a[10];
    char b[10];
}

void test() {
    char *msg;
    struct foo foo;

    msg = kmalloc(16, GFP_KERNEL);
    strcpy(msg, "Hello world!!");
    // this copy overwrites foo.b
    strcpy(foo.a, msg);
}

The questionable copy overflows foo.a and writes to foo.b as well. It
cannot be detected by KASAN. Currently it is also not detected by fortify,
because strcpy considers __builtin_object_size(x, 0), which considers the
size of the surrounding object (here, struct foo). However, if we switch
the string functions over to use __builtin_object_size(x, 1), the compiler
will measure the size of the closest surrounding subobject (here, foo.a),
rather than the size of the surrounding object as a whole. See
https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Object-Size-Checking.html for more info.

Only do this for string functions: we cannot use it on things like
memcpy, memmove, memcmp and memchr_inv due to code like this which
purposefully operates on multiple structure members:
(arch/x86/kernel/traps.c)

	/*
	 * regs->sp points to the failing IRET frame on the
	 * ESPFIX64 stack.  Copy it to the entry stack.  This fills
	 * in gpregs->ss through gpregs->ip.
	 *
	 */
	memmove(&gpregs->ip, (void *)regs->sp, 5*8);

This change passes an allyesconfig on powerpc and x86, and an x86 kernel
built with it survives running with syz-stress from syzkaller, so it seems
safe so far.

Cc: Daniel Micay <danielmicay@...il.com>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@...omium.org>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@...omium.org>
Signed-off-by: Daniel Axtens <dja@...ens.net>
---
 include/linux/string.h | 27 ++++++++++++++++-----------
 1 file changed, 16 insertions(+), 11 deletions(-)

diff --git a/include/linux/string.h b/include/linux/string.h
index 3b8e8b12dd37..e7f34c3113f8 100644
--- a/include/linux/string.h
+++ b/include/linux/string.h
@@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ void __write_overflow(void) __compiletime_error("detected write beyond size of o
 #if !defined(__NO_FORTIFY) && defined(__OPTIMIZE__) && defined(CONFIG_FORTIFY_SOURCE)
 __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strncpy(char *p, const char *q, __kernel_size_t size)
 {
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
 	if (__builtin_constant_p(size) && p_size < size)
 		__write_overflow();
 	if (p_size < size)
@@ -329,7 +329,7 @@ __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strncpy(char *p, const char *q, __kernel_size_t size)
 
 __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strcat(char *p, const char *q)
 {
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
 	if (p_size == (size_t)-1)
 		return __builtin_strcat(p, q);
 	if (strlcat(p, q, p_size) >= p_size)
@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strcat(char *p, const char *q)
 __FORTIFY_INLINE __kernel_size_t strlen(const char *p)
 {
 	__kernel_size_t ret;
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
 
 	/* Work around gcc excess stack consumption issue */
 	if (p_size == (size_t)-1 ||
@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ __FORTIFY_INLINE __kernel_size_t strlen(const char *p)
 extern __kernel_size_t __real_strnlen(const char *, __kernel_size_t) __RENAME(strnlen);
 __FORTIFY_INLINE __kernel_size_t strnlen(const char *p, __kernel_size_t maxlen)
 {
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
 	__kernel_size_t ret = __real_strnlen(p, maxlen < p_size ? maxlen : p_size);
 	if (p_size <= ret && maxlen != ret)
 		fortify_panic(__func__);
@@ -367,8 +367,8 @@ extern size_t __real_strlcpy(char *, const char *, size_t) __RENAME(strlcpy);
 __FORTIFY_INLINE size_t strlcpy(char *p, const char *q, size_t size)
 {
 	size_t ret;
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
-	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
+	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 1);
 	if (p_size == (size_t)-1 && q_size == (size_t)-1)
 		return __real_strlcpy(p, q, size);
 	ret = strlen(q);
@@ -388,8 +388,8 @@ __FORTIFY_INLINE size_t strlcpy(char *p, const char *q, size_t size)
 __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strncat(char *p, const char *q, __kernel_size_t count)
 {
 	size_t p_len, copy_len;
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
-	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
+	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 1);
 	if (p_size == (size_t)-1 && q_size == (size_t)-1)
 		return __builtin_strncat(p, q, count);
 	p_len = strlen(p);
@@ -502,11 +502,16 @@ __FORTIFY_INLINE void *kmemdup(const void *p, size_t size, gfp_t gfp)
 /* defined after fortified strlen and memcpy to reuse them */
 __FORTIFY_INLINE char *strcpy(char *p, const char *q)
 {
-	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 0);
-	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 0);
+	size_t p_size = __builtin_object_size(p, 1);
+	size_t q_size = __builtin_object_size(q, 1);
+	size_t size;
 	if (p_size == (size_t)-1 && q_size == (size_t)-1)
 		return __builtin_strcpy(p, q);
-	memcpy(p, q, strlen(q) + 1);
+	size = strlen(q) + 1;
+	/* test here to use the more stringent object size */
+	if (p_size < size)
+		fortify_panic(__func__);
+	memcpy(p, q, size);
 	return p;
 }
 
-- 
2.20.1

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