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Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2017 15:23:17 +0000
From: James Morse <james.morse@....com>
To: kpark3469@...il.com
CC: kernel-hardening@...ts.openwall.com, catalin.marinas@....com, 
 keescook@...omium.org, will.deacon@....com, mark.rutland@....com, 
 panand@...hat.com, keun-o.park@...kmatter.ae
Subject: Re: [PATCH] arm64: usercopy: Implement stack frame object validation

Hi Sahara,

On 25/01/17 13:46, kpark3469@...il.com wrote:
> From: Sahara <keun-o.park@...kmatter.ae>
> 
> This implements arch_within_stack_frames() for arm64 that should
> validate if a given object is contained by a kernel stack frame.

Thanks for wade-ing into this, walking the stack is horribly tricky!


> diff --git a/arch/arm64/include/asm/thread_info.h b/arch/arm64/include/asm/thread_info.h
> index 46c3b93..f610c44 100644
> --- a/arch/arm64/include/asm/thread_info.h
> +++ b/arch/arm64/include/asm/thread_info.h
> @@ -68,7 +68,62 @@ struct thread_info {
>  #define thread_saved_fp(tsk)	\
>  	((unsigned long)(tsk->thread.cpu_context.fp))
>  
> +/*
> + * Walks up the stack frames to make sure that the specified object is
> + * entirely contained by a single stack frame.
> + *
> + * Returns:
> + *		 1 if within a frame
> + *		-1 if placed across a frame boundary (or outside stack)
> + *		 0 unable to determine (no frame pointers, etc)

(Shame the enum in mm/usercopy.c that explains these isn't exposed)


> + */
> +static inline int arch_within_stack_frames(const void * const stack,
> +					   const void * const stackend,
> +					   const void *obj, unsigned long len)
> +{
> +#if defined(CONFIG_FRAME_POINTER)
> +	const void *oldframe;
> +	const void *callee_fp = NULL;
> +	const void *caller_fp = NULL;
> +
> +	oldframe = __builtin_frame_address(1);

So we always discard _our_ callers frame. This will vary depending on the
compilers choice on whether or not to inline this function. Its either
check_stack_object() (which is declared noinline) or __check_object_size().
I think this is fine either way as obj should never be in the stack-frames of
these functions.


> +	if (oldframe) {
> +		callee_fp = __builtin_frame_address(2);
> +		if (callee_fp)
> +			caller_fp = __builtin_frame_address(3);
> +	}
> +	/*
> +	 * low ----------------------------------------------> high
> +	 * [callee_fp][lr][args][local vars][caller_fp'][lr']

These are the caller's args and local_vars right?


> +	 *                ^----------------^
> +	 *               allow copies only within here
> +	 */
> +	while (stack <= callee_fp && callee_fp < stackend) {
> +		/*
> +		 * If obj + len extends past the caller frame, this
> +		 * check won't pass and the next frame will be 0,
> +		 * causing us to bail out and correctly report
> +		 * the copy as invalid.
> +		 */
> +		if (!caller_fp) {

> +			if (obj + len <= stackend)

Isn't this always true? check_stack_object() does this:
>	if (obj < stack || stackend < obj + len)
>		return BAD_STACK;


> +				return (obj >= callee_fp + 2 * sizeof(void *)) ?
> +					1 : -1;

You do this twice (and its pretty complicated), can you make it a macro with an
explanatory name? (I think its calculating caller_frame_end from callee_fp,
having something like caller_frame_start and caller_frame_end would make this
easier to follow).


> +			else
> +				return -1;
> +		}
> +		if (obj + len <= caller_fp)
> +			return (obj >= callee_fp + 2 * sizeof(void *)) ? 1 : -1;
> +		callee_fp = caller_fp;
> +		caller_fp = *(const void * const *)caller_fp;

You test caller_fp lies within the stack next time round the loop, what happens
if it is miss-aligned? unwind_frame() tests the new fp to check it was 16-byte
aligned. If not, its probably a corrupted stack frame.

I wonder if you can make use of unwind_frame()? We have existing machinery for
walking up the stack, (it takes a callback and you can stop the walk early).
If you move this function into arch/arm64/kernel/stacktrace.c, you could make
use of walk_stackframe().

I guess you aren't using it because it doesn't give you start/end ranges for
each stack frame, I think you can get away without this, the callback would only
needs to test that the provided frame->fp doesn't lie between obj and (obj+len).
Calculating the frame start and end is extra work for the bounds test - we
already know obj is contained by the stack so its just a question of whether it
overlaps an fp record.


> +	}
> +	return -1;

check_stack_object()'s use of task_stack_page(current) means you will never see
this run on the irq-stack, so no need to worry about stepping between stacks.

This looks correct to me, walking the stack is unavoidably complex, I wonder if
we can avoid having another stack walker by using the existing framework?




Thanks,

James

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