Openwall GNU/*/Linux - a small security-enhanced Linux distro for servers
[<prev] [next>] [day] [month] [year] [list]
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 11:36:38 -0500
From: Minga Minga <mingakore@...il.com>
To: john-users@...ts.openwall.com
Subject: New john.conf rules (Part 2 of 9999)

Here are some more rules written for JtR that I've been working on. Part 2
of 9999 ;)

(Solar, I used i[0] instead of i0 syntax because sometimes it is easier to
read for a newbie. In general I'd say that like 1-5% of JtR users can
read/understand the rules. Anything to make them easier to read helps in
my mind).

-Minga


-----------------------------------------------------------

# This is a simple rule that just add 4 numbers to the end of a string.
# Especially useful with a dictionary of ALL 4 letter combinations
# or a list of all the months, or dictionary words, or a list of
# first or last names, etc etc - cracks passwords like:
# March2008 Mike1008 Winter9999 Austin1111
#
[List.Rules:KoreLogicRulesJust4Num]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[0123456789]


# This rule capitalized the first character of the wordlist, then
# Prepends 2 numbers -- then prepends a special character
# The most common special characters (for me) are !@#$ so I do all
# of them first, then I do the least common ones. This speeds up the
# results for me. You can obviously combine them.
# Also - consider removing the first 'c' from each line if you
# notice passwords aren't starting with a capital letter.
# This cracks passwords like: 15!Hello 86!System 62!Abcde 07!Apr26
#
[List.Rules:KoreLogicRulesPrependNumNumSpecial]
ci[0][0123456789]i[1][0123456789]i[2][!@#$]
ci[0][0123456789]i[1][0123456789]i[2][%^&*()_+\-={}|\[\]\\;':",./\<\>?`~]



# This rule PrePends some special characters to the beginning of a wordlist
# I noticed that lots of people will tack on special characters at the
# beginning of a password - then just use dictionary words for the rest.
# In the cases below, I only prepend !@#$ which are the most common
# special chars for what *I* needed - add more if you want.
# This cracks !Tuesday !Baseball !!OCT2008 , etc
[List.Rules:KoreLogicRulesPrependSpecialSpecial]
# prepend !@#$ characters
i0[!@#$]
# Capitalize the first letter of the wordlist, THEN prepend !@#$
ci0[!@#$]
# prepend !@#$ and then ANOTHER set of !@#$ characters (total = 2)
i0[!@#$]i1[!@#$]
# Capitalize the first letter of the wordlist, THEN prepend !@#$ (total = 2)
ci0[!@#$]i1[!@#$]


# This rule Prepends a special character - THEN appends a special character
# then appends 2 numbers. Sounds weird - but if you feed it a simple list
# of words - you will find being doing this. Notice I dont capitalize
# the first char in the wordlist - maybe you should?
# Cracks passwords like :  !Monday07 !September03 !Ricky11 !Giants03
#
[List.Rules:KoreLogicRulesPrependSpecialAppendNumbersNumber]
i0[!$@...&*?.+\-_=`~()|]$[!$@...&*?.+\-_=`~()|]$[0123456789]$[0123456789]


# This rule needs to be rewritten. It capitalizes (or doesnt) the first
# char of your wordlist - then Appends 2 numbers - followed by 2 identical
# special characters.
# Using this rule - you can special a very small wordlist (4 characters
# will even be enough) and crack complex 8 char passwords.
# Useful for cracking passes such as : 12KW06!!  123bob!!  23Kate$$ 1976oa$$
# If you use a word list that contains ALL possible upper and lower
# case combinations - you can delete the lines below that start with a 'c'
#
[List.Rules:KoreLogicRulesAppendNumbersNumbersSpecialSpecial]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[$]$[$]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[$]$[$]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[!]$[!]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[!]$[!]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[@]$[@]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[@]$[@]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[#]$[#]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[#]$[#]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[%]$[%]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[%]$[%]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[*]$[*]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[*]$[*]
$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[?]$[?]
c$[0123456789]$[0123456789]$[?]$[?]

-- 
To unsubscribe, e-mail john-users-unsubscribe@...ts.openwall.com and reply
to the automated confirmation request that will be sent to you.

Powered by blists - more mailing lists

Your e-mail address:

Confused about mailing lists and their use? Read about mailing lists on Wikipedia and check out these guidelines on proper formatting of your messages.