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Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 19:24:09 -0500
From: <cve-assign@...re.org>
To: <andreyknvl@...gle.com>
CC: <cve-assign@...re.org>, <oss-security@...ts.openwall.com>,
	<kcc@...gle.com>, <dvyukov@...gle.com>, <edumazet@...gle.com>
Subject: Re: CVE Request: Linux: signed overflows for SO_{SND|RCV}BUFFORCE

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256

> There's a bug in SO_{SND|RCV}BUFFORCE setsockopt() implementation,
> which allows CAP_NET_ADMIN users to cause memory corruption.
> 
> The fix is upstream:
> https://github.com/torvalds/linux/commit/b98b0bc8c431e3ceb4b26b0dfc8db509518fb290

>> CAP_NET_ADMIN users should not be allowed to set negative
>> sk_sndbuf or sk_rcvbuf values, as it can lead to various memory
>> corruptions, crashes, OOM...

Use CVE-2016-9793. This affects, for example, 4.8.12.


We might not completely understand the CVE implications of the "Note
that before
https://github.com/torvalds/linux/commit/82981930125abfd39d7c8378a9cfdf5e1be2002b
the bug was even more serious, since SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF were
vulnerable" comment within the
b98b0bc8c431e3ceb4b26b0dfc8db509518fb290 commit message.
82981930125abfd39d7c8378a9cfdf5e1be2002b is a commit from 2012. The
3.5 release has this, whereas the 3.4 release does not.

For now, we are assigning CVE-2012-6704 to mean the analogous
vulnerability involving SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF that affects "before
3.5" kernels.

- -- 
CVE Assignment Team
M/S M300, 202 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730 USA
[ A PGP key is available for encrypted communications at
  http://cve.mitre.org/cve/request_id.html ]
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