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Date: Tue,  2 Feb 2016 14:36:06 -0500 (EST)
From: cve-assign@...re.org
To: oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
Cc: cve-assign@...re.org
Subject: Re: Socat security advisory 7 - Created new 2048bit DH modulus

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>   In the OpenSSL address implementation the hard coded 1024 bit DH p
>   parameter was not prime. The effective cryptographic strength of a key
>   exchange using these parameters was weaker than the one one could get by
>   using a prime p. Moreover, since there is no indication of how these
>   parameters were chosen, the existence of a trapdoor that makes possible
>   for an eavesdropper to recover the shared secret from a key exchange that
>   uses them cannot be ruled out.

This was sent to the oss-security list as a published advisory, not as
a CVE ID request. We would expect that one or more parties (e.g.,
Linux distributions) are planning to re-announce this to a different
audience in a way that would make at least one CVE ID especially
useful. Our question is about whether anyone needs two CVE IDs.

A CVE ID must be for a specific vulnerability (although we realize
that the CVE ID may often be used to track the update). Here, there
can be a CVE ID for the "was not prime" finding in the sense that p is
supposed to be prime, and a non-prime value is an implementation error
regardless of any other details of the situation. With the currently
published information, we do not see a way to generate a second CVE ID
for something related to "no indication of how these parameters were
chosen" or "cannot be ruled out."

- -- 
CVE assignment team, MITRE CVE Numbering Authority
M/S M300
202 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730 USA
[ PGP key available through http://cve.mitre.org/cve/request_id.html ]
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