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Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 02:59:05 -0500 (EST)
From: cve-assign@...re.org
To: oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
Cc: cve-assign@...re.org
Subject: Re: Fwd: FFmpeg: stealing local files with HLS+concat

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> http://habrahabr.ru/company/mailru/blog/274855

As far as we can tell, there are two distinct cross-origin issues
within FFmpeg's URL processing. Use CVE-2016-1897 for the concat issue
(which is fully described in the blog/274855 reference) and
CVE-2016-1898 for the subfile issue (which is mentioned but not
described in the blog/274855 reference).

The essential problem is that a crafted file forces the victim to
visit an arbitrary external URL, but this URL is constructed using
data from the victim's local filesystem.


> https://github.com/ctfs/write-ups-2015/tree/master/9447-ctf-2015/web/super-turbo-atomic-gif-converter

This might describe a vulnerability, but we aren't sure whether the
access to file:///home/ctf/flag.txt is really unintended FFmpeg
behavior. This might be better modeled as a site-specific
vulnerability in the web service, because it should have arranged for
the file:///home/ctf/flag.txt URL to be interpreted within an
appropriately safe sandbox context.

Similarly, the reports of FFmpeg SSRF in blog/274855 might be better
modeled as site-specific vulnerabilities within the "online video
conversion" web application.

- -- 
CVE assignment team, MITRE CVE Numbering Authority
M/S M300
202 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730 USA
[ PGP key available through http://cve.mitre.org/cve/request_id.html ]
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