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Date: Sat, 08 Sep 2012 18:14:10 -0600
From: Kurt Seifried <kseifried@...hat.com>
To: oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
CC: Tavis Ormandy <taviso@...xchg8b.com>
Subject: Re: note on gnome shell extensions

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On 09/08/2012 04:36 PM, Tavis Ormandy wrote:
> List, I just installed Fedora 17 on a workstation. While
> researching how to upgrade gnome 3 to version 2, I noticed it
> installed a browser extension called "Gnome Shell Integration".
> 
> $ rpm -qf
> /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins/libgnome-shell-browser-plugin.so 
> gnome-shell-3.4.1-5.fc17.x86_64
> 
> The NPPVpluginDescriptionString states "It can be used only by 
> extensions.gnome.org", but I happen to know that is a tricky thing
> to get right.

Erk yeah not good.

> The plugin incorrectly trusted hostname, and initialized. As far as
> I can tell, the plugin will let you install new shell extensions, I
> don't know what the impact of that is, can they contain native
> code?
> 
> Tavis.

Good news: In theory at least Gnome shell extensions are only
JavaScript and (optional) CSS using the Gjs bindings, the JavaScript
itself is run using SpiderMonkey. So no native code execution as far
as I know.

Bad news: It looks like it has bindings to run command lines from
within a Gnome Shell Extensions:

http://developer.gnome.org/glibmm/unstable/group__Spawn.html
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9606404/gnome-shell-extensions-stdout-from-glib-iochannel

- -- 
Kurt Seifried Red Hat Security Response Team (SRT)
PGP: 0x5E267993 A90B F995 7350 148F 66BF 7554 160D 4553 5E26 7993

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