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Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 12:15:05 +0200
From: Pierre Schweitzer <pierre@...ctos.org>
To: Bastian Blank <waldi@...ian.org>, oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
Subject: Re: PostgreSQL - Predictable cancel key

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Hi Bastian,

On 06/15/2015 08:26 PM, Bastian Blank wrote:
> Hi Pierre
> 
> On Mon, Jun 15, 2015 at 10:32:37AM +0200, Pierre Schweitzer wrote:
>> I had a look at glibc random implementation, they got rid of the
>> old LCG they were using for a "nonlinear additive feedback" PRNG
>> which uses a 31 numbers state. That means that knowing a number
>> in the pseudo-random stream you cannot recover the whole
>> generator state to compute the next PRN, as it was possible with
>> a LCG.
> 
>> So, basically, if I'm right (correct otherwise!) knowing your
>> cancel key and your PID makes it really hard to know which key
>> belongs to other PIDs. Because you still lack two pieces of
>> information: the initial state (deduced from the knowledge of the
>> seed) and the state of the generator when it generated your key
>> (or perhaps knowing just one state would be enough? Anyway, it's
>> missing).
> 
> The seed is not public, but you missed one detail: there are only
> one million different ones.  This seed is the only input of the
> PRNG.  With one million starting points (which is a lot less then
> the complete state) you can easily brute force the seed for the
> returned values.

Well, I've thought about it, but that's still one million seeds and
the cancel key you're looking for might have been generated after
several random() call. So, that means perhaps 10 millions values to
explore? (If we make the hypothesis that for a given initialization,
it will only draw 10 PRN)

How relevant would still be your cancel key once you found it?

> After you know the complete state, you can calculate possible
> state ranges for different PID.

The exploration range still seem to look huge to me, no?

I mean, let's say you auth to PGSQL, you get your cancel key. Next,
you'll try the one million seeds + X drawn numbers to find if you find
yours, so that you can match the appropriated seed.
Given your seed, you can generate all the cancel keys for all the PID
you find, and attempt to find which one matches which one. With all
the noise you'll have in PIDs (gone PGSQL connections, other random
processes started & gone, and so on).

Or you have a fastest/simplest method I would have missed?

Cheers,
- -- 
Pierre Schweitzer <pierre@...ctos.org>
System & Network Administrator
Senior Kernel Developer
ReactOS Deutschland e.V.
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