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Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2014 11:29:41 -0700
From: Kurt Seifried <kseifried@...hat.com>
To: oss-security@...ts.openwall.com
Subject: Re: CVE Request?: konqueror - https uses all ciphers,
 even weak ones

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On 03/03/2014 06:06 AM, Tim Brown wrote:
> On Thursday 27 February 2014 17:30:54 Marcus Meissner wrote:
>> Hi,
>> 
>> I am wondering a bit ...
>> 
>> We received this bugreport for the KDE default webbrowser
>> Konqueror: https://bugzilla.novell.com/show_bug.cgi?id=865241
>> 
>> Basically https://www.howsmyssl.com reports that even the weak 
>> EXPORT ciphera are in use by konqueror.
>> 
>> And yes, it is right... DES40, RC2, DES_CBC  (single DES) ...
>> should definitely not be used these days anymore.
>> 
>> 
>> Do you think use of export ciphers should get CVEs these days?
>> 
>> It does not seem intentional, konqueror just uses everything
>> openssl has without explicit filtering by default.

As the stated purpose of encryption is to strongly protect
communications, both integrity (e.g. modification) and confidentiality
(e.g. not being able to read it) then using encryption such as DES
40/56 can be broken in single digit seconds (I'm guessing near real
time now with dedicated hard ware) and hours on standard PCs obviously
violates the stated intent of using encryption.

So the question becomes where do we draw the line? 40 and 56 are
obviously weak, standard computers, let alone something with a GPU can
crack it quickly. Do we draw the line at <128 bits, <3DES or something
else?


- -- 
Kurt Seifried Red Hat Security Response Team (SRT)
PGP: 0x5E267993 A90B F995 7350 148F 66BF 7554 160D 4553 5E26 7993
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